If you or a family member stutters, then you may be quite confused as to what to do about it, what it means, or how common the problem even is. Many people hold incorrect beliefs about stuttering, and they usually serve to create a stigma about the problem.

Therefore, it's time to learn fact from fiction, and take in some important truths about stuttering. Take a look at these common stuttering facts and misconceptions, and separate myth from reality for yourself.

Fact: Millions of People Stutter

According to The Stuttering Foundation, approximately 68 million people across the world stutter, and about 3 million Americans do. That accounts for approximately 1% of the global and US population, respectively, and means there are literally millions of others like yourself.

Fact: Stuttering Runs in the Family

Many people do not realize that stuttering can actually be passed down genetically. Research shows that approximately 60% of people who stutter have a family member who stutters a well.

Fact: Stuttering Affects More Men than Women

Four times more men than women are affected by stuttering. It's not a misconception to believe that you have seen many more males with a stuttering condition than females. Still, that does mean that there would be able 13 million women across the globe who stutter, based on the statistical cited above.

Fiction: Emotional Trauma Causes Stuttering

Emotional trauma has not been proven to cause stuttering. In fact, research shows that children and adults who stutter are no more likely to have psychological or emotional problems than those who do not stutter.

Fiction: I Should Just Wait it Out

Many parents think that if their child is stuttering, they should just wait it out, and the child will sort it out on his or her own. That's not typically the best course of action, and stuttering problems can become more ingrained over time. After three or six months of a child stuttering, it's likely in everyone's best interest to get seek an evaluation from a speech and language pathologist.

Fiction: Stuttering is All the Same

There is actually a wide range of how severa a stuttering problem may be, as well as the specifics of how it affects each person's speech. There are many different stuttering patterns and behaviors, and even from person to person, there may be inconsistency on a day-to-day level.

Hopefully you've been able to learn more about stuttering, some common stuttering myths, as well as important facts. If you or a loved one has been coping with stuttering, then you may want to consult with a speech and language pathologist. He or she will be able to provide you with a quality plan of action to address your concerns and beginning making great strides forward.